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Letters

Archbishop Chaput: how to meet the challenges to religious freedom

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 Contents - Sep 2012AD2000 September 2012 - Buy a copy now
Editorial: 2012 Fighting Fund launched: support Christian values - Peter Westmore
Sainthood: Cardinal Van Thuân: process to beatification 'very advanced' - Michael Gilchrist
News: The Church Around the World
Film: 'For Greater Glory': an inspiring message for today's Christians - Babette Francis
Survey confirms crisis of faith in Ireland - Michael Gilchrist
Noted UK doctor slams BBC program's anti-Catholic bias - Robert Walley
Interview: Egypt after Mubarak: 'Christians feel excluded' - Father Andrzej Halemba
Letters: Archbishop Chaput: how to meet the challenges to religious freedom - Archbishop Charles Chaput OFM
Time for women's "true genius" to reassert itself - Anne Lastman
Australian Catholic Students Association Conference 2012 - Br Barry Coldrey
The Church's mission priority: to search for its 'lost sheep' - Andrew Kania
Letters: Media bias - Anne Lastman
Letters: Achilles' heel - Fr John George
Letters: Appreciation - Frank O'Connor
Letters: Article of faith? - Jean-Leon Shanks
Letters: Power of the Rosary - Gabrielle Gannon
Letters: Old Testament - Fr Brian Harrison OS
Books: A COMPANION TO CATHOLIC EDUCATION, by Leonardo Franchi (Editor) - Gerard O'Shea (reviewer)
Books: THROUGH SHAKESPEARE'S EYES: Seeing the Catholic presence in the plays, Pearce - Michael E. Daniel (reviewer)
Books: FATIMA FOR TODAY: The Urgent Marian Message of Hope, by Fr Andrew Apostoli CFR - Brother Barry Coldrey (reviewer)
Books: Order books from www.freedompublishing.com.au
Reflection: Fatima: Mary's appeal for penance and conversion - Bishop Arthur Serratelli

This is the edited text of an address by Archbishop Charles Chaput OFM Cap of Philadelphia on 20 June 2012 in Indianapolis to a group of Catholic journalists on the eve of the "Fortnight for Freedom," a national campaign of teaching, witness, and prayer against the US Government's abortifacient and contraceptive mandate and in favour or religious freedom.

Religious freedom is a cornerstone of the American experience. This is so obvious that once upon a time, nobody needed to say it. But times have changed. So it's worth recalling that Madison, Adams, Washington, Hamilton, Franklin, Jefferson - in fact, nearly all the American founders - saw religious faith as vital to the life of a free people. Liberty and happiness grow organically out of virtue. And virtue needs grounding in religious faith.

Gertrude Himmelfarb, the historian, put it this way: The founders knew that in a republic, "virtue is intimately related to religion. However sceptical or deistic they may have been in their own beliefs, however determined they were to avoid anything like an established Church, they had no doubt that religion is an essential part of the social order because it is a vital part of the moral order."

Freedom of religion is more than freedom of worship. The right to worship is a necessary but not sufficient part of religious liberty. Christian faith requires community. It begins in worship, but it also demands preaching, teaching, and service. It's always personal but never private. And it involves more than prayer at home and Mass on Sunday - though these things are vitally important. Real faith always bears fruit in public witness and public action. Otherwise it's just empty words.

The founders saw the value of publicly engaged religious faith because they experienced its influence themselves. They created a nation designed in advance to depend on the moral convictions of religious believers, and to welcome their active role in public life.

Government coercion

Threats against religious freedom in our country are not imaginary. They're happening right now. They're immediate, serious, and real, given the pattern of government coercion that includes the current administration's HHS mandate interfering with the conscience rights of medical providers and private employers, as well as individual citizens and attacks on the policies, hiring practices, and tax statuses of religious charities and ministries.

Why is this hostility happening? A lot of it links to Catholic teaching on the dignity of life and human sexuality. Catholic moral convictions about abortion, contraception, the purpose of sexuality, and the nature of marriage are rooted not just in revelation, but also in reason and natural law. Human beings have a nature that's not just the product of accident or culture, but inherent, universal, and rooted in permanent truths knowable to reason.

The problem, as Notre Dame law professor Gerry Bradley points out, is that critics of the Church reduce all these moral convictions to an expression of subjective religious beliefs. And if they're purely religious beliefs, then - so the critics argue - they can't be rationally defended. And because they're rationally indefensible, they should be treated as a form of prejudice. In effect, 2,000 years of moral tradition and religious belief become a species of bias. Opposing same-sex "marriage" thus amounts to religiously blessed homophobia.

There's more, though. When religious belief gets redefined downward to a kind of private bias, then the religious identity of institutional ministries has no public value - other than the utility of getting credulous people to do good things. So exempting Catholic adoption agencies, for example, from placing kids with gay couples becomes a concession to private prejudice. And concessions to private prejudice feed bigotry and hurt the public. Or so the reasoning goes. This is how moral teaching and religious belief end up getting hounded as hate speech.

Unless we work hard to keep our religious liberty, we'll lose it. It's already happening in other developed countries like Britain and Canada. The US Constitution is a great document - historically unique for its fusion of high ideals with the realism of very practical checks and balances. But in the end, it's just an elegant piece of paper.

In practice, nothing guarantees our freedoms except our willingness to fight for them. That means fighting politically and through the courts, without tiring and without apologies. We need to realise that America's founding documents assume an implicitly religious anthropology - an idea of human nature, nature's God, and natural rights - that many of our leaders no longer really share. We ignore that unhappy fact at our own expense.

Spiritual core

Politics and the courts are important. But our religious freedom ultimately depends on the vividness of our own Christian faith - in other words, how deeply we believe it, and how honestly we live it. Religious liberty is an empty shell if the spiritual core of a people is weak. Or to put it more bluntly, if people don't believe in God, religious liberty isn't a value. That's the heart of the matter. It's the reason Pope Benedict calls us to a Year of Faith this October.

The worst enemies of religious freedom aren't "out there" among the legion of critics who hate Christ or the Gospel or the Church, or all three. The worst enemies are in here, with us - all of us, clergy, religious, and lay - when we live our faith with tepidness, routine, and hypocrisy.

Religious liberty isn't a privilege granted by the state. It's our birthright as children of God. And even the worst bigotry can't kill it in the face of a believing people. But if we value it and want to keep it, then we need to become people worthy of it. Which means we need to change the way we live - radically change, both as individual Catholics and as the Church.

We need to look honestly at the arc of Catholic history in our country. The lessons may not be comforting. American Catholics began as an unwelcome minority. The Church built her credibility by defending and serving her people. She developed her influence with the resources her people entrusted to her. A vast amount of good was done in the process. We need to honour that. But two other things also happened. The Church in the United States became powerful and secure. And Catholics became less and less invested in the Church that their own parents and grandparents helped to build.

I think it's fair, in part, to blame Church leaders for a spirit of complacency and inertia, clericalism, even arrogance, and for operating off a model of the Church - often for well-intentioned reasons - rooted in the past and out of touch with reality. But there's plenty of blame to go around.

Too many ordinary Catholics have been greedy, losing themselves in America's culture of consumerism and success. Too many have been complicit in the dullness - the  acedia - that has seeped into Church life, and the cynicism and resentment that naturally follow it.

These problems kill a Christian love of poverty and zeal. They choke off a real life of faith. They create the shadows that hide institutional and personal sins. And they encourage a paralysis that can burrow itself into every heart and every layer of the Church, right down to individual Catholics in the pews. The result is that Philadelphia, like so much of the Church in the rest of our country, is now really mission territory - again for the second time.

The real Jesus

My point is this. We live in a world of illusions when we lose sight of who Jesus Christ really is, and what he asks from each of us as disciples. One of novelist Ray Bradbury's characters once said, "I wonder if God recognises his own son the way we've dressed him up, or is it dressed him down? He's a regular peppermint stick now, all sugar crystal and saccharine." Father John Hugo, a friend and counsellor to Dorothy Day, put it even more forcefully when he wrote of our "falsified picture of Jesus [with his] eyes perpetually raised to heaven, soft, even girlish in beauty, [the] very incarnation of impotence."

The real Jesus, in Hugo's words, "did not hesitate to condemn the rich, to warn the powerful, to denounce in vehement language the very leaders of the people. His love and goodness were chiefly for the poor, the simple, the needy. And his love for them was not a limp, indulgent love, like that of a silly, frivolous mother. To his friends he preached poverty of spirit, detachment, the carrying the cross. No more did the kindness of Jesus spare his followers, than the kindness of God the Father spared his son. We are to drink of the same chalice that he drank of."

That's our vocation. That's the life of honesty, heroism, and sacrifice God calls us to as a Church and as individual believers. And in our eagerness to escape it, to tame it, to reshape it in the mould of our own wilful ideas, we've failed not only to convert our culture, but also to pass along the faith to many of our own children.

Emerging American adults - in other words, young people in the 18-23 age cohort - are not only sceptical of organised religion in general and Christianity in particular, but they often lack the vocabulary to engage in, or even identify, issues that require basic moral reasoning. As a group they have unusually high rates of intoxication, loneliness, and sexual alienation. They also, contrary to popular belief, have very little interest in public affairs or political engagement, and a lopsided focus on materialistic consumption and financial security as the guiding stars of their lives.

Of course, tens of thousands of exceptions to these are walking around right now. We all know some of them. These are young adults of faith and strong moral character, determined to do something worthy with their lives. For example,  Our Sunday Visitor did a portrait of Catholic young adults who live the Gospel with really wonderful passion and joy. Their lives will touch hundreds of other lives. And that should give us enormous hope. God never abandons his Church or his people.

But their good witness only brings us back to the conversion that you and I and the whole Church in the United States need to undergo.

Notre Dame scholar Christian Smith and his colleagues, whose research on emerging adults is so compelling, wrote that "most of the problems in the lives of youth have their origin in the larger adult world into which youth are being socialised ... [One] way or the other, adults and the adult world are almost always complicit in the troubles, suffering and misguided living of youth, if not the direct source of them. The more adults can recognise and admit that fact, [the] sooner we will be able to address some of young people's problems more constructively."

I suppose that's obvious. But if it's really so obvious, then who let it happen? And what are we going to do about it?

We're becoming a nation where, as Ross Douthat describes it, "a growing number [of us] are inventing [our] own versions of what Christianity means, abandoning the nuances of traditional theology in favour of religions that stroke [our] egos and indulge, or even celebrate, [our] own worst impulses." And it's happening at a time when the Church is compromised by her own leaders and people from within, and pushed to the margins or attacked by critics without.

Testify for truth

Tomorrow we start the Fortnight for Freedom. It's a moment for each of us to be grateful to our bishops for doing the right thing - the important and urgent thing - at the right time. If we don't press now and vigorously for our religious liberty in the public arena, we will lose it. Not overnight and not with a thunderclap, but step by step, inexorably.

But we also need to remember with Pope Benedict that resistance is "part of the task of the Church," and with Henri de Lubac that it's "not our mission to make truth triumph, but to testify for it."

Scripture says, "Seek first his kingdom and his righteousness and all these things shall be yours as well" (Mt 6:33). We work best for religious freedom by first opening our hearts to God's will instead of our own and loving our country and our Church and renewing the witness of the Church with the zeal and purity and obedience of our own lives. That freedom, that joy, no one can ever take from us.

From the cross at San Damiano, Jesus said to Francis: Repair my house, which is falling into ruin. Those same words fill this room tonight. How we respond is up to us.

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Reprinted from AD2000 Vol 25 No 8 (September 2012), p. 10

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