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Reflection

Benedict XVI's Christmas homily: 'Make room for God'

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 Contents - Dec 2013AD2000 December 2013 - Buy a copy now
Editorial: A Christmas Wish - Peter Westmore
Pope Francis to canonise John Paul II and John XXIII next April - Michael Gilchrist
News: The Church Around the World
Obituary: Cardinal Pell's tribute to Bishop William Brennan - Cardinal George Pell
Benedict XVI corresponds with an atheist mathematician - Joseph Trabbic
Inspirational Young Men of God retreat - Br Barry Coldrey
Catechesis and liturgy: an unbreakable bond - Bishop Arthur Serratelli
Schools: Catholic school education: returning to our roots - Paul McCormack
Christifidelis Laici: vocation and mission of the lay faithful (1) - Anne Lastman
Christifidelis Laici: vocation and mission of the lay faithful (2) - Anne Lastman
Letters: Morality of contraception - John Ramsey
Letters: Right of conscience - Marian Grima
Letters: Errors - Peter D. Howard
Letters: Availability of RU486 - Owen Charles
Books: HOLY SEE, UNHOLY ME by Tim Fischer - John Barich (reviewer)
Books: POPE FRANCIS: The Pope from the End of the Earth, by Thomas J. Craughwell - Br Barry Coldrey (reviewer)
Fighting Fund: Progress on 2013 Fighting Fund - Peter Westmore
Books: Order books from www.freedompublishing.com.au
Reflection: Benedict XVI's Christmas homily: 'Make room for God' - Benedict XVI

Again and again the beauty of this Gospel touches our hearts: a beauty that is the splendour of truth. Again and again it astonishes us that God makes himself a child so that we may love him, so that we may dare to love him, and as a child trustingly lets himself be taken into our arms.

It is as if God were saying: I know that my glory frightens you, and that you are trying to assert yourself in the face of my grandeur. So now I am coming to you as a child, so that you can accept me and love me.

I am also repeatedly struck by the Gospel writer's almost casual remark that there was no room for them at the inn. Inevitably the question arises: What would happen if Mary and Joseph were to knock at my door? Would there be room for them?

And then it occurs to us that Saint John takes up this seemingly chance comment about the lack of room at the inn, which drove the Holy Family into the stable; he explores it more deeply and arrives at the heart of the matter when he writes: "He came to his own home, and his own people received him not" (Jn 1:11).

Moral question

The great moral question of our attitude towards the homeless, towards refugees and migrants takes on a deeper dimension: do we really have room for God when he seeks to enter under our roof? Do we have time and space for him? Do we not actually turn away God himself? We begin to do so when we have no time for God.

By reflecting on that one simple saying about the lack of room at the inn, we have come to see how much we need to listen to Saint Paul's exhortation: "Be transformed by the renewal of your mind" (Rom 12:2).

Let us ask that we may make room for him within ourselves, that we may recognise him also in those through whom he speaks to us: children, the suffering, the abandoned, those who are excluded and the poor of this world.

There is another verse from the Christmas story on which I should like to reflect with you the angels' hymn of praise, which they sing out following the announcement of the newborn Saviour: "Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace among men with whom he is pleased."

God is glorious. God is pure light, the radiance of truth and love. He is good. He is true goodness, goodness par excellence.

Linked to God's glory on high is peace on earth among men. Where God is not glorified, where he is forgotten or even denied, there is no peace either. Nowadays, though, widespread currents of thought assert the exact opposite: they say that religions, especially monotheism, are the cause of the violence and the wars in the world. If there is to be peace, humanity must first be liberated from them.

Now it is true that in the course of history, monotheism has served as a pretext for intolerance and violence. It is true that religion can become corrupted and hence opposed to its deepest essence, when people think they have to take God's cause into their own hands, making God into their private property. We must be on the lookout for these distortions of the sacred.

While there is no denying a certain misuse of religion in history, yet it is not true that denial of God would lead to peace. If God's light is extinguished, man's divine dignity is also extinguished. Then the human creature would cease to be God's image, to which we must pay honour in every person, in the weak, in the stranger, in the poor.

Only if God's light shines over man and within him, only if every single person is desired, known and loved by God is his dignity inviolable, however wretched his situation.

So Christ is our peace, and he proclaimed peace to those far away and to those near at hand (cf. Eph 2:14, 17). How could we now do other than pray to him: Yes, Lord, proclaim peace today to us too, whether we are far away or near at hand.

Grant also to us today that swords may be turned into ploughshares (Is 2:4), that instead of weapons for warfare, practical aid may be given to the suffering. Enlighten those who think they have to practise violence in your name, so that they may see the senselessness of violence and learn to recognise your true face. Help us to become people "with whom you are pleased" people according to your image and thus people of peace.

Holy curiosity

Let us go over to Bethlehem, says the Church's liturgy. Transeamus is what the Latin Bible says: Let us go "across", daring to step beyond, to make the "transition" by which we step outside our habits of thought and habits of life, across the purely material world into the real one, across to the God who in his turn has come across to us.

Let us ask the Lord to grant that we may overcome our limits, our world, to help us to encounter him, especially at the moment when he places himself into our hands and into our heart in the Holy Eucharist.

The shepherds made haste. Holy curiosity and holy joy impelled them. In our case, it is probably not very often that we make haste for the things of God. God does not feature among the things that require haste. The things of God can wait, we think and we say. And yet he is the most important thing, ultimately the one truly important thing.

Why should we not also be moved by curiosity to see more closely and to know what God has said to us? At this hour, let us ask him to touch our hearts with the holy curiosity and the holy joy of the shepherds, and thus let us go over joyfully to Bethlehem, to the Lord who once more comes to meet us.

The above are extracts from Pope Benedict XVI's homily at the Christmas 2012 Mass in St Peter's Basilica.

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Reprinted from AD2000 Vol 26 No 11 (December 2013 - January 2014), p. 20

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