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Reflection

The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light

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 Contents - Dec 2014AD2000 December 2014 - Buy a copy now
Editorial: The Coming of Christ - Peter Westmore
Family Synod: Synod reaffirms Church teaching on marriage and family - AD2000 Report
News: The Church Around the World
Dissent: New controversy erupts in Toowoomba - Peter Westmore
Vocations: Young Men of God Retreat for 2014 another success - Br Barry Coldrey
The Long View: Catholicism today and the lessons of history - John Young
Economic justice: The Catholic Church explains sexual mores - with economics - Emma Green
Cardinal Pell: Synod rebuts 'secular agenda' - Catholic News Service
The after-life: Why pray for those who are no longer with us? - Audrey English
Separation of church and state: the position outside Australia - Frank Mobbs
Obituary: Fr Benedict Groeschel, aged 81, dies in New Jersey - Peter Westmore
Letters: Toowoomba trouble - Tristan Ross
Letters: Synod of Bishops - Arnold Jago
Letters: Language - Frank O'Connor
Letters: Last man standing! - Anne Lastman
Books: IN THE HOUSEHOLD OF THE SPIRIT: Guide to the Sacraments in the Byzantine Church - Paul Simmons (reviewer)
Books: AUSTRALIAN CATHOLIC YOUTH MINISTRY, by C. Fini and C. Ryan (Eds) - Br Barry Coldrey (reviewer)
Support: 2014 Fighting Fund Progress
Books: Order books from www.freedompublishing.com.au
Reflection: The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light - Pope Francis

The prophecy of Isaiah, "The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light" (Is 9:1), never ceases to touch us, especially when we hear it proclaimed in the liturgy of Christmas night. This is not simply an emotional or sentimental matter. It moves us because it states the deep reality of what we are: a people who walk, and all around us and within us as well there is darkness and light. In this night, as the spirit of darkness enfolds the world, there takes place anew the event which always amazes and surprises us: the people who walk see a great light. A light which makes us reflect on this mystery: the mystery of walking and seeing.

Walking: this verb makes us reflect on the course of history, that long journey which is the history of salvation, starting with Abraham, our father in faith, whom the Lord called one day to set out, to go forth from his country toward the land which he would show him. From that time on, our identity as believers has been that of a people making its pilgrim way toward the promised land.

This history has always been accompanied by the Lord! He is ever faithful to his covenant and to his promises. "God is light, and in him there is no darkness at all" (1 Jn 1:5). Yet on the part of the people there are times of both light and darkness, fidelity and infidelity, obedience, and rebellion, times of being a pilgrim people and times of being a people adrift.

In our personal history, too, there are both bright and dark moments, lights and shadows. If we love God and our brothers and sisters, we walk in the light but if our heart is closed, if we are dominated by pride, deceit, self-seeking, then darkness falls within us and around us. "Whoever hates his brother writes the Apostle John is in the darkness; he walks in the darkness, and does not know the way to go, because the darkness has blinded his eyes" (1 Jn 2:11).

On this night, like a burst of brilliant light, there rings out the proclamation of the Apostle: "God's grace has been revealed, and it has made salvation possible for the whole human race" (Tit 2:11).

The grace which was revealed in our world is Jesus, born of the Virgin Mary, true man and true God. He has entered our history; he has shared our journey. He came to free us from darkness and to grant us light. In him was revealed the grace, the mercy, and the tender love of the Father: Jesus is Love incarnate. He is not simply a teacher of wisdom, he is not an ideal for which we strive while knowing that we are hopelessly distant from it. He is the meaning of life and history, who has pitched his tent in our midst.

The shepherds were the first to see this "tent", to receive the news of Jesus's birth. They were the first because they were among the last, the outcasts. And they were the first because they were awake, keeping watch in the night, guarding their flocks.

Together with them, let us pause before the Child, let us pause in silence. Together with them, let us thank the Lord for having given Jesus to us, and with them let us raise from the depths of our hearts the praises of his fidelity: We bless you, Lord God most high, who lowered yourself for our sake. You are immense, and you made yourself small; you are rich and you made yourself poor; you are all-powerful and you made yourself vulnerable.

On this night let us share the joy of the Gospel: God loves us, he so loves us that he gave us his Son to be our brother, to be light in our darkness.

To us the Lord repeats: "Do not be afraid!" (Lk 2:10). And I too repeat: Do not be afraid! Our Father is patient, he loves us, he gives us Jesus to guide us on the way which leads to the promised land. Jesus is the light who brightens the darkness. He is our peace. Amen.

This is the text of Pope Francis' homily during the Christmas night Mass in St Peter's Basilica on 24 December 2013.

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Reprinted from AD2000 Vol 27 No 11 (December 2014 - January 2015), p. 20

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